Adiop

Woman’s passion for African culture builds bridges, promotes knowledge

ONUMBA.COM – Anita M. Diop is an African– American born and raised in America.  But she has a unique way of describing herself:  “I’m an African born in America.”

That uncommon Africentric, Pan Africanist portrayal of herself speaks volume about a woman who is ferocious when it comes to her passion for African people and culture. 

For starters, Diop is married to an African immigrant from Senegal.  Her college education focused entirely on Africa.  First, was a Bachelor’s Degree in Africana Studies and Speech Communications, followed by a Master’s Degree in African History, with a specialization in Arts and Culture, all from Wayne State University, Detroit. “I love myself and I love my people,” she told the Call & Post in an interview last week. And that’s not an empty cliché, either. Indeed, Diop is profusely involved in a smorgasbord of activities which expresses that love. She is the founder and executive director of the African Roots and Heritage Festival, a non-profit 501(c) (3) organization she established in 2008 out of the remnants of a startup group called the Black Cultural Festival she formed the year before. 

The group’s mantra is:  “Celebrating Our Heritage, while Confronting the Challenges” of being Black in America.  Its mission, as noted in its website, www.africanrootsandheritagefestival.org, is to promote African culture, arts, the unity of all African people, under the umbrella philosophy of pan-Africanism. Continue Reading

Davante

Columbus teen formed group to help homeless veterans

ONUMBA.COM – Davante Goins is only 15-years old.  But he is not your typical 15-year old. 
Goins is a 10th grade sophomore at Mifflin High School.  When you talk to him, he sounds every bit like a teenager.  And he probably does many of the same things folks his age do. But Goins, notwithstanding his youthful age, is a young man on a mission:  to help homeless veterans. Referred by the officials of the Columbus School District, the Call & Post called Goins up last week to find out the kind of things he is up to these days. He is up to a lot.  

Goins told the Call & Post he was looking forward to a big meeting on his calendar with the officials of the Columbus Veterans Affairs.  There, he would discuss his plan to help homeless veterans. 

NBC4 TV has featured his story.  He has had meetings with the Columbus City Council and other government leaders to share his plans for helping homeless veterans. 

And those plans tell the story of a focused young man with a noble goal. Goins is the chief executive director of ‘Operation Shelter 4 Homeless Veterans,’ an organization he established to help place homeless veterans in ‘transitional homes.’

The group’s website, ‘operation4homelessveterans.org,’ says its mission is “to get homeless veterans off the streets of Columbus, Ohio.”   A huge part of that, said Goins, is to refurbish “vacant and abandoned properties, to be remodeled into transition homes for the homeless veterans to reside in.”

“We want to clean up Columbus and get homeless veterans off the street,” he told the Call & Post.  He pointed to the “5,700” abandoned and vacant homes in Columbus that could be converted into homes to house homeless veterans.  And “the number is still growing,” he said. 

His goal is to repair these homes for homeless veterans. Continue Reading

Dickcheney

Pony up Halliburton: Oil giant to pay Nigeria $35 million to settle bribery case

ONUMBA.COM – When Nigeria filed a lawsuit on December 7 against former U.S. Vice-President Dick Cheney and oil company Halliburton, some probably dismissed the move as an ostentatious pursuit of the impossible. Well – it wasn’t.    

Rather, it was pay-up time. 

Halliburton has agreed to pay the West African nation the sum of $35 million to settle a bribery scandal which Nigerian officials said occurred when Cheney was the Chief Executive Officer of Halliburton. Cheney, 69, and ailing, was with the company before being elected vice-president of the United States under President George W. Bush in 2000. Nigeria accepted the deal even though a settlement of $250 million was sought. By accepting the deal, Nigeria agreed to rescind the lawsuit and all charges filed against Kellogg Brown and Root (KBR) and all entities and persons named in the case. 

This saga escalated after Nigeria’s anti graft agency, Economic and Financial Crimes Commission, deepened its investigation of Halliburton activities in the country, probing Cheney’s role in the bribery scandal.       

Cheney, arguably the most powerful vice-president in the history of the United States, was the leader of Halliburton when a suspicious gas plant popped up in the Delta region of Southern Nigeria, prompting questions by Nigerian officials over whether Cheney and other Halliburton officials paid Nigerian government officials $180 million in “cash for contract” bribery to secure $6 billion contracts for the construction of the liquefied natural gas (LNG) plant. Continue Reading

Fish2

Columbus man is seeking to lead warring Somalia

ONUMBA.COM – Mahatma Ghandi’s words that we should be the “change we want to see in the world,” is probably no more than just a lofty cliché for a lot of people. But for one Columbus resident, it has become much more than that. 

It’s also a call to action. Abdulkadir “Fish” Ali said that it’s time to rescue his war-battered homeland from the mean-spirited grip of politicians he characterized as “inhumane, unwise and heartless.”  These folks, he said, have for years fanned the flame of a vicious conflict that has brought Somalia to its knees. 

Yet, through it all, Ali, like other Somalis, paced the sideline with hands folded as their troubled homeland ravaged in deepening squalor. But that was then. In an interview last week, the 52-year old Ali told the Call & Post that he has seen enough. Continue Reading

Somalipic

Quit complaining about the Somalis, get involved

Onumba.com — Pouting, whining, caterwauling, kvetching and scowling all over the place with long faces isn’t the solution.  It won’t help non-Somali African immigrants in Columbus get through the doors of government opportunities. Understand one thing, please:  ‘squeaky wheel gets the grease.’   And that’s pretty much what’s playing out here. Of course, it is abundantly clear, unless one has been camping out in a cave, that the Somalis, for what it is worth, are soaking up all the oxygen of attention from governments and community groups compared to other African immigrant communities? But why? For one thing, a stampede of them arrived here as hapless refugees needing a smorgasbord of government assistance to settle in a strange land. Continue Reading